Male hrt side effects

Conflicting data concerning the effects of medroxyprogesterone on bone mineral density have been reported.

In one study, women 25 to 51 years of age receiving medroxyprogesterone 150 mg intramuscularly every three months for five or more years for long-term contraception had a reduction in bone mineral density compared with premenopausal controls. However, bone mineral density in the treatment group was still significantly greater than that observed in postmenopausal controls.

A study of 200 women who received medroxyprogesterone 150 mg intramuscularly every three months for a median duration of 12 years (range 2 to 26 years) reported that bone density was significantly reduced in medroxyprogesterone users. However, bone mineral density in women starting depot medroxyprogesterone after the age of 20 years and using it for 15 or fewer years was greater than the remainder of the cohort.

A study to determine the potential for postmenopausal fracture due to residual effects of depot medroxyprogesterone in former users reported the risk to be small and unlikely to have substantial impact in postmenopausal women. No significant differences in bone density were found, however, women who had used depot medroxyprogesterone for greater than 2 years had a trend toward lower bone densities.

Bone density in 185 women receiving long-term depot medroxyprogesterone for a mean of 5 years (range of 1-16 years) was only minimally below the normal population despite decreased estrogen levels. [ Ref ]

Observational studies: These kinds of studies collect information about a large group of people but don’t give them a certain treatment, such as a drug. In observational studies of MHT, the women and their doctors decide what hormone drugs, if any, the women take and for how long. These kinds of studies can also gather information about other factors that can influence cancer risk. Some observational studies gather data about what happened over previous years. Others follow (observe) people for years to look at how different factors (like MHT) affect cancer risk. Observational studies can be less costly than randomized clinical trials, so they’re more common and often enroll many more patients.

The years preceding the cessation of periods are often complicated by cyclical symptoms. Apart from heavy painful periods, there may be premenstrual symptoms for seven or ten days a month, menstrual migraine for two or three days which together with general tiredness, depression and loss of libido can result in women only having about 7 good days a month. These PMDD / climacteric symptoms should be recognised and the simple treatment consists of elevated plasma oestradiol levels that suppress ovarian activity and cyclical hormonal changes. In this way the cyclical symptoms of this condition cease. There is no evidence that oral oestrogens help in this situation because the work has not been done and published, but certainly transdermal oestrogens in the form of gels, patches or implants have been shown to help in good randomised trials. The most straight forward treatment is to use 200 mcgs of oestradiol patch twice weekly or Oestrogel cream two doses daily. This should be supplemented by small doses of transdermal testosterone. As these patients have a uterus it is important for them to have cyclical progestogen in the form of Norethisterone (or equivalent) 5 mgs for the first seven days of each calendar month. This will give a regular bleed on about day 10 of each calendar month. Thus the periods are re-set.

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Male hrt side effects

male hrt side effects

Do not consider WebMD User-generated content as medical advice. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your care plan or treatment. WebMD understands that reading individual, real-life experiences can be a helpful resource but it is never a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment from a qualified health care provider. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or dial 911 immediately.

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